There are many styles of Colonials. Their double hung windows, second floor bedrooms and overall symmetry make them easy to spot. Here’s a few of the most popular Colonials and what to look for.

Pros
Colonial homes usually have a traditional, bold elegance.

Cons
The uniform, multi-level design of Colonials can force living areas to be divided into several small rooms, instead of one large one.


New Traditional Colonial

Steeply sloped roofs

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While the barn-like profile is associated with almost all Colonials, New Traditional homes typically have steeply sloped roofs composed of two dual-pitched gables. These roofs end up forming two sets of planes on each side with the outer plane being much steeper.

Multiple Roof Lines

multiple_roof_lines

Many Colonial homes often have multiple steep, imposing rooflines with gables facing in different directions.

 

Colonial Revival

Sided In White Clapboard

This is a classic look in which long, thin boards are used to cover the outside walls of the house.

Gambrel Roofs

Gambrel roofs are a type of gabled roof, which is composed of two dual-pitched gables. The broken roof slopes form two sets of planes on each side, with the outer plane at a steeper pitch.

 

Cape Cod Colonial

Steeply Pitched Gabled Roof

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A steeply pitched gabled roof usually implies that the house is much older. A rule of thumb is the steeper the pitch of the roof, the older the home. Gabled roofs consist of sloping planes that meet at a ridge supported by two triangular walls.

Dormers and Shutters

The gabled dormers on Cape Colonials help punctuate their steep rooflines. The overall simplicity of the distinctive window shutters help cheer up the exterior and promote symmetry throughout the home.

 

Monterey Revival Colonial

Low-Pitched Gabled Roofs with Shingles or Red Clay Tiles

red_clay_tiles
The low-pitched gabled roofs on Monterey Revival Colonials are usually covered with wood shingles or red clay tiles. This look was most likely inspired by Spanish townhouses.

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